Sign in. “Children’s literature and culture helped promote the lie of Black animality by presenting African Americans as apes or monkeys, either via racist caricature or via monkey characters who behaved like they imagined African Americans behaved,” explains Philip Nel, an English professor at Kansas State University and author of Was the Cat in the Hat Black? While it’s important to build your library with excellent children’s books like these, which explicitly address race and racism in age-appropriate ways, it’s equally important to protect your child’s developing mind from racist narratives like the eight listed below. All Votes Add Books To This List. If they do not open simply by clicking on the link, try pressing the Control Key and clicking at the same time! “Though I, too, heard the ‘tiger’ version when I was a kid,” he says, “the rhyme has such a strong association with the N-word that it should be retired—permanently. Boys and Girls Come Out to Play. 1: Elias Zapple's Rhymes from the Cabbage Patch by. Nursery Rhymesthat begin with the letterB. Add to Collection Add to Wantlist Remove from Wantlist. It also morphed into the equally problematic “Ten Little Indians,” which is offensive toward Indigenous people. One American children’s song about the latter, “Mamma’s Little Baby Loves Short’nin’ Bread,” was originally titled “Mammy’s Little Baby Loves Short’nin’ Bread.” But even with this change, Mammy and Mamma are so close in spelling and sound, it is nearly impossible to separate the two in this song that mocks African American language and confines Black women to White women’s kitchens. A Wise Old Owl. Another is that it associates Asians with either poor hygiene or subservience. Mother Goose Club | Nursery Rhymes for Kids Playlist Mother Goose Club; 1,010 videos; 614,121 views; Updated today; Play all Share. Mother Goose & Other Nursery Rhymes (Part Two) Credits Composed By, Arranged By, Producer – Wade Denning, Jr.* Reviews Add Review [r1295093] Release. OLD MOTHER GOOSE. For example, here are 12 amazing Asian Americans you didn’t learn about in school. One of those things is nursery rhymes, many of which are deeply embedded with racism. Through policies like the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and Japanese internment camps during World War II, Asian Americans have been perpetually marginalized in this country. One version of it features this line: “Ten little n**ger boys went out to dine;/ One choked his little self, and then there were nine.” The use of this rhyming song in children’s books and in minstrel shows over many decades reasserted a false sense of superiority in Southern Whites still burning because they lost the Civil War—and it literally helped teach White children to hate. This chant, however, is neither innocent nor fun. According to Nel, back in the day, it was also “performed in ‘N**ro dialect’ by White men in blackface.” In case you were wondering, this is why desegregation didn’t put an end to racism in America. Artifacts of a deeply segregated, violent, and racist America no longer belong in our kids’ libraries. “Ten Little Indians” permeated popular culture through the 20th century, making genocide and dehumanization a sing-song delight for American children of all races. We are no longer supporting IE (Internet Explorer), BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and People of Color), small ways you can fight racism every day, 12 amazing Asian Americans you didn’t learn about in school, everyday acts of racism that don’t get talked about enough, reasons some Black Americans don’t celebrate the Fourth of July, why desegregation didn’t put an end to racism in America, Little Mouse and Other Charming Chinese Rhymes, how one mother is talking to her daughter about racism, Do Not Sell My Personal Information – CA Residents. This book is important for two reasons: first, because it contained so many rhymes and second, because pretty much every edition of Mother Goose rhymes …