Citrus trees continue to grow through the winter and are more prone to freeze damage than deciduous trees. It can take 10 years to see the first fruit on a tree planted from seed, as opposed to grafted plants, which will bear fruit in only three years. Dig out any weeds that appear near the trunk of the tree with a spade. In USDA Zones 8 to 11, kumquat trees can grow outdoors in the ground. Fertilizer can boost flower and fruit production and increase overall tree health. Allow the top 1-inch of soil to dry before watering your tree and avoid over-watering. If this tree does not receive adequate sunlight, it will have stunted growth. The fruit is usually harvested in January. The fruit is usually harvested in January. Mulch if with a 2- to 3-inch layer of organic mulch such as shredded leaves. Observe the damaged branches for a few weeks prior to pruning to make sure that you don’t remove a part of the branch that could recover by itself. Best grown in USDA zones 9 and 10, but can withstand temperatures as low as 18F (-8C). Place some iron tablets in the ground around the tree if your soil’s pH level is greater than 7.0. Fruits look similar to oranges but come to the size of a plum. It is a shrubby, slow-growing tree that is 8 to 15 feet tall. You can place your kumquat tree outdoors in a sunny spot during the warmer summer months. © Copyright 2020 Hearst Communications, Inc. Providing the right cultural conditions from the start will help the tree to have a long, healthy life. Otherwise, when growing kumquat trees in pots, group containers together and cover with a blanket on cold nights. Kumquat trees will adapt to many different well-drained soils. Water regularly after planting with a garden hose to help the tree establish healthy, deep roots. Kumquats are cold-hardy trees that will generally thrive if grown in proper conditions. How to Fertilize a Leptospermum Laevigatum Australian Tea Tree. Kumquats will grow in almost any type of soil and can tolerate any soil pH, just make sure that the soil is well draining! The cumquat is one of the most decorative, compact and cold- tolerant citrus. Kumquat tree produces fragrant flowers in late spring, followed by small citrus fruit in the fall. In USDA Zones 8 to 11, kumquat trees can grow outdoors in the ground. Mulch helps to retain moisture in the soil and suppress weeds. Observe the damaged branches for a few weeks prior to pruning to make sure that you don't remove a part of the branch that could recover by itself. Once established, only water during extended periods of drought, when the plant is in flower and when fruit is developing. The most common kumquat species with edible fruits are Meiwa, Hong Kong, Nagami and Marumi. Plant your kumquat tree in a container if you live in Zones 4 to 11. Citrus trees are fun and easy to grow. Every citrus tree loves the sun, and kumquat is no exception. Plant in full sun. Both species hail from China, and have been cultivated in the West since the 1800s. How to Care for a Kumquat Tree. Put a layer of gravel on the bottom of the container to help provide good drainage. A peculiar feature of cumquat fruit is the edible rind, which adds considerable flavour to the tart, juicy, segmented, seedy flesh within. Putting kumquat trees grown in containers on a wheeled dolly will allow you to move the tree into a sheltered area more easily. Even if you place it in a container, do not keep it away from the sunlight. The most common kumquat species with edible fruits are Meiwa, Hong Kong, Nagami and Marumi. Make sure you use a large enough container to give your kumquat tree room to grow and a container that has adequate drainage holes. Use a sand-based potting mix. The Nagami kumquat does well in sandy soils, however. A member of the citrus family, kumquats (Fortunella spp.) The flavor is a combination of sweetness and bitterness. Terry has written articles and publications for a wide range of markets and subject matters, including Medicine & Health, Eli Financial, Dartnell Publications and Eli Journals. The tree produces small yellowish orange fruits in the fall that boast a distinctive combination of sweet and sour. Learn which plants thrive in your Hardiness Zone with our new interactive map! Apply a citrus fertilizer to the soil during the growing season, about every six weeks, or as directed by the label. Place the container in bright sunlight, preferably in a window with southern exposure. When to Water. Try to protect your trees during periods of severe cold by covering them with blankets. The kumquat tree provides a fruit that can be eaten raw or preserved in sugar syrup. Kumquats should only be left outside in USDA zones 8 … If your kumquat trees are planted in the ground, pruning is not usually necessary, but you may need to prune away branches damaged by cold or freezing. If you live in Zones 4 to 11, kumquat trees need to be grown in a pot as a patio plant and moved indoors during the cold winter months. Sufficient sunlight coupled with pruning will aid the growth of your kumquat. All Rights Reserved. Believed to have originated in China, the kumquat tree is generally grown in Florida, California and Texas.