I'm Gillian and I am passionate about food preservation. A dehydrator carefully dries your fragile herbs and helps to retain all the flavors. Some people will argue that hanging and drying is better. For the most flavorful greens, harvest herbs before the herb plants bloom. You don’t need to stick around, you can do that over night too. Big-boxed dehydrators don’t require this though. To allow for better air circulation, you may need to remove some of the trays and use only two or so. For the most flavorful greens, harvest herbs before the herb plants bloom. Once your herbs are clean, place them on a single layer in the dehydrator, which helps dry them evenly. These herbs have a high moisture content and they often mold if they are not dried quickly in a dehydrator or some other method. While a food dehydrator may seem like a splurge, it is an investment for a hobby that can save you time, energy, and money in the long run. Some good examples include basil, thyme, parsley, oregano, tarragon, and mint. While a food dehydrator may seem like a splurge, it is an investment for a hobby that can save you time, energy, and money in the long run. Step #1: Choose the right herbs Before you start drying herbs in your dehydrator, make sure you pick the right herbs, as some taste better dry than others. Learn which plants thrive in your Hardiness Zone with our new interactive map! I personally prefer to dry my herbs in the dehydrator, especially if I process a larger batch. Ideally, you should use dried herbs within a year. Gather your herbs from the garden early in the day. Dehydrator – Quickest Option. Usually, there is plenty of herb left at the end of the season. The boxed kind is big and allows hot air to circulate appropriately, without requiring you to move things around. Don’t let them go bad, and dry them to save them for whenever you feel ready to use them. Conditions vary, but a typical temperature for drying herbs varies between 95-120 degrees F. Allow your herbs to cool down, and then crush them into smaller pieces. Storing herbs is a great way to add flavor variety to your stored foods. Well, it isn’t too hard, but before we go into details. You can tell they’re ready, when they feel dry to the touch and crumble easily. The smaller kind is a bit less reliable, so you should consider checking your herbs during the process. Drying herbs in a dehydrator is perhaps the best options. These all have high water content, so they mold quickly when fresh. If the herbs are crisp and crumbly, turn off the dehydrator. You can leave small leaves on the stems, but remove larger leaves from thick stems to shorten the drying time. Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator. … If you like saving money, drying herbs in a dehydrator is a very good idea and a good investment. Ultimate Food Preservation is compensated for referring traffic and business to these companies. Copyright Leaf Group Ltd. // Leaf Group Lifestyle. Copyright © 2020 Ultimate Food Preservation, Canned Tomatillo Salsa For Your Next Dinner Party [Recipe], Spice It Up With This Chili Lime Beef Jerky [Recipe]. They will be done when they are completely dry and crumbly. Snip stems from the plants at a leaf junction. Like we mentioned before, drying herbs in a dehydrator is far easier and quicker than doing it the old fashion way.This machine can dry all of your herbs in three to four hours while air-drying them takes up to a month (depending on the climate where you live). As a regular contributor to Natural News, many of Hatter's Internet publications focus on natural health and parenting. If the leaves of the herb you want to dry are large enough not to fall through the holes in the trays found in the dehydrator, take them off the stems. Gardeners with an herb garden usually enjoy fresh herbs all summer long while the herb plants are growing and thriving in the soil. These are the steps that you can follow when drying herbs in a dehydrator. Check the herbs to see if they have dried sufficiently after the hour elapses. If you like saving money, drying herbs in a dehydrator is a very good idea and a good investment. Ultimate Food Preservation is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. With the thyme, remove the leaves from the stems. A dehydrator can be used with nearly all herbs but is especially good for herbs such as basil, oregano, tarragon, lemon balm, and mints. Enjoy herbs year-round without any problems. How To Dry Herbs Using a Dehydrator. You can wash your herbs thoroughly and let them air-dry completely. Don’t be afraid of using either one. Many of the herbs that I dehydrate are dry in as little as an hour. Before you start drying herbs in your dehydrator, make sure you pick the right herbs, as some taste better dry than others. Drying herbs in a dehydrator is a fast and simple process. Some of the many herbs suitable for drying in a dehydrator include basil, tarragon, oregano, mints, rosemary, thyme, sage, parsley and lemon balm. I own two dehydrators, so I can actually dry two types of herbs at a time. If they are not sufficiently dry, run the dehydrator for another hour and check the herbs again. Keep in mind that you should handle herbs carefully, so you don’t … You are now ready to start drying herbs in a dehydrator whenever you want. Writer Bio Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator, as well as an accomplished gardener, quilter, crocheter, cook, … On the other hand, it is very small and compact, so it saves counter space and uses less energy. Keep the herbs in a dry and cool space. You can store in an airtight container or a Ziploc plastic bag. There are, however, models that don’t have a thermostat, so you should pick the shortest time and check the herbs regularly. Preheat your dehydrator with the thermostat set between 95 and 115 degrees Fahrenheit. Gardeners with an herb garden usually enjoy fresh herbs all summer long while the herb plants are growing and thriving in the soil. Shake the colander in the sink to remove excess water from the herbs. Place your herbs on the dehydrator racks that came with your dehydrator. As with most produce, it is important to make sure there isn’t any dirt or traces of microorganisms. Then, I just stack the dehydrator trays, flip the switch and leave them to do their thing. Remove as much air from the bags as possible and seal them. Place the colander in the sink and wash the herbs lightly under cold running water. The size also allows you to dehydrate various herbs at a time. Group the different herbs together and remember where you place the herbs in the trays. If necessary, cover the trays with a screen to prevent them from falling. Set the food dehydrator to a temperature between 90 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the colander in the sink and wash the herbs lightly under cold running water. If you are drying herbs with the stamp, make sure that the stamp is no longer than an inch because it affects drying time.